OPERA2DAY

Thursday 1 February 2018

Background articles on Hamlet

Background articles on Hamlet

THE ROMANTIC TRADITION IN WAX CYLINDERS AND 78 RPM RECORDS: HAMLET HISTORICALLY INSPIRED

In Dr. Miracle’s last illusion, OPERA2DAY’s most recent production, the musicians played remarkably freely. This was not a whim; it was deliberated. Conductor Hernán Schvartzman and Emlyn Stam, artistic leader of the New European Ensemble, wanted to make music after the fashion of their colleagues of well over a century ago, who took more liberties than is customary now. This approach is continued in Hamlet. In order to be able to perform the music in accordance with history, Hernán and Emlyn studied old recordings. The approach by the New European Ensemble and OPERA2DAY is truly trail-blazing, with Hamlet as the first pièce de résistance. Read more.

FROM GRAND OPÉRA TO OPÉRA NOIR: THE CINEMATIC APPROACH TO HAMLET

Film noir and nouvelle vague were important sources of inspiration to stage-manage Hamlet. These genres strongly determined the production’s design. Moreover, film as a medium takes a key part in the show. Director Serge van Veggel and film-maker Margo Onnes joined forces and explain their approach.

VIVE HAMLET! AMBROISE THOMAS' MASTERPIECE REHABILITATED

Which were OPERA2DAY’s motivations for staging Hamlet? Which approach uses OPERA2DAY to produce this grand opéra? What is the story told by the production? Artistic director Serge van Veggel explains the coming about of the new production of Hamlet, almost 100 years after the opera was staged in The Hague for the last time. Read more.

GRANDEUR ET DÉCADENCE: A CENTURY OF THEÂTRE FRANÇAIS IN A NUTSHELL

There was a time that the Koninklijke Schouwburg – OPERA2DAY’s base – was the focus of every opera enthusiast in the Netherlands. It was the largest opera house in the country and there were not many other cities in Europe giving so many French operas than The Hague. The Schouwburg owed its prominent position to the Théâtre Français de la Haye, a company staging at least three different operas a week – between 1804 and 1919 - at the Korte Voorhout. Read more.

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